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Unilever truer med at standse reklamer på Facebook, Google m.fl.

Unilever, dagligvare-gigant med et af verdens største markedsføringsbudgetter, truer nu Facebook og Google: Hvis I ikke gør noget ved udbredelsen af hate speech på nettet, stopper vi med at annoncere på jeres platform
Unilever, dagligvare-gigant med et af verdens største markedsføringsbudgetter, truer nu Facebook og Google: Hvis I ikke gør noget ved udbredelsen af hate speech på nettet, stopper vi med at annoncere på jeres platform

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Klart. De multinationale er naturligvis specielt udsatte for rasende polemik og komment.... . nå ja undskyld 'hate speech' - som vi danskere naturligvis ikke har et ord for overhovedet. Eksotisk fænomen.

@Odd Du har ret. Her et stykke 'hatespecch sakset fra corporateeurope.org

In the showroom area of the conference (the World Water Fair), corporations such as Nestlé, Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux, Unilever, and Heineken showcased their efforts to promote sustainability and water efficiency, while their CEOs addressed the assembly demanding that water be recognised as an economic good rather than as a human right.[11] In fact, all the Forum rhetoric focused on human 'needs' as opposed to a concept of human 'rights', consistent with the World Water Vision in which the concept of water as a human right does not appear.[12] This emphasis away from discussion of human rights complimented with the following Ministerial Meeting declaration's recognition of water as an economic good proved to be a major ideological victory for the corporations seeking inroads into the water market.

Another ideological victory that was won by the private sector and neo-liberal minded government officials at the Forum, was official recognition of the importance of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the water sector. Public-Private Partnerships, whereby government and industry cooperate on a project (usually a public service), constitute a small percentage of the makeup of the world's water management systems. However, in light of the outcomes of the conference, this may very well increase in the next few years. Numerous documents and workshops and individual speeches throughout the Forum all spoke of the successes of existing Public-Private Partnership models and the promises they bring. The rationale offered for these partnerships was that 'cash-strapped' governments, mostly in the South, cannot afford the necessary infrastructure and services necessary to provide water services to their populations.

Not once was it suggested that governments cannot afford to invest in their water services, because they are recovering from financial crises, asphyxiated by IMF-imposed structural adjustment programmes, and 'cash-strapped' because they are forced to spend a huge percentage of their annual budgets on servicing debts to donor countries and multilateral financial institutions.

Flemming Berger og Arne Albatros Olsen anbefalede denne kommentar